Sci-Tech Expert – Science & Technology News, Reviews and Articles

Google submits plans to expand Silicon Valley headquarters

February 28, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Google Inc submitted plans on Friday for a vastly expanded headquarters at the Silicon Valley city where the tech giant is based, presenting a bucolic vision of movable structures to be built under curving and translucent canopies. The submission of the plan to the City Council in Mountain View, California, which the company chose for its headquarters 15 years ago, marks the first step in what city officials describe as a long review process. The new headquarters would give the Internet company the room for an additional 10,000 employees, compared to the 20,000 Google staffers that currently work in the city, a Google spokeswoman said. Google's blueprint for new headquarters in the city's North Bayshore district has gathered widespread attention because the design is seen as architecturally innovative.

Read the original post: 
Google submits plans to expand Silicon Valley headquarters

Google submits plans to expand Silicon Valley headquarters

February 28, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Google Inc submitted plans on Friday for a vastly expanded headquarters at the Silicon Valley city where the tech giant is based, presenting a bucolic vision of movable structures to be built under curving and translucent canopies. The submission of the plan to the City Council in Mountain View, California, which the company chose for its headquarters 15 years ago, marks the first step in what city officials describe as a long review process. The new headquarters would give the Internet company the room for an additional 10,000 employees, compared to the 20,000 Google staffers that currently work in the city, a Google spokeswoman said. Google's blueprint for new headquarters in the city's North Bayshore district has gathered widespread attention because the design is seen as architecturally innovative.

Read the original here:
Google submits plans to expand Silicon Valley headquarters

Three Uses for a Vacuum Coating System

February 27, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Written by: Denton Vacuum, LLC

Certain manufacturing techniques are shaping the modern world, and the future to come. It would not be possible to produce the kind of technology we have today, at the scale in which we use it, without some kind of method to reduce waste and improve conditions for production. Sputter deposition, for instance, allows us a level of precision down to mere microns in thickness. This allows us to create powerful semiconductors at an extremely small scale, powering ever smaller devices used in a host of applications.

Vacuum coating systems have had a major impact on every major sector in American and worldwide manufacturing. Here are a few of those practical applications.

Medical

Anti-glare coating is not a simple spray, or else it would be washed or rubbed away as the user cleans his glasses. Instead, the lens is placed into a vacuum sealed chamber where anti-glare chemicals can evenly coat its surface. The transition is so seamless that the user doesn’t even notice the coating.

Catheters are just one of many internal medical devices that benefit from acqueous coatings. These chemicals make the surface of the instrument pliable within the user’s body, so she can comfortably wear a device without fear of irritating her skin or internal organs.

Anti-microbial coatings further stop infection and improve patient recovery times. These coatings are applied to all manner of instruments, and they kill of infections that find their way into someone’s body through healing wounds.

Industrial

Vacuum metalizing is used heavily in the aerospace industry, and in the auto industry to a certain extent. Plastic has a higher availability than stronger metals, and it’s not always feasible to manufacture a part made entirely of metals. Instead, the plastic is used as a base for a metallic coating. This strengthens the plastic with the properties of the metal and reduces the costs to manufacture all sorts of parts.

Scientific

Vacuum coating systems are primarily used in situations where controlling temperature is imperative. This is one reason why it’s so useful in metallization, where the intense heat needed to turn the metal into gas would completely destroy any plastic parts to be coated. Instead, the chamber is cooled to a specific temperature.

These systems also allow for extreme precision in the coating of an object. There are no physical defects visible, and layers of chemicals are so thin that the substrate remains virtually unchanged.

Apple faces second suit from victorious patent firm

February 26, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Fresh off a $532.9 million jury win against Apple Inc, a Texas company is again suing the tech giant, this time over the same patents' use in devices introduced after the original case was underway. Smartflash LLC aims to make Apple pay for using the patent licensing firm's technology without permission in devices not be included in the previous case, such as the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus and the iPad Air 2. The trial covered older Apple devices. On Tuesday, a jury in federal court in Tyler, Texas found that Apple willfully violated three Smartflash patents with devices that use its iTunes software.

Read the original here: 
Apple faces second suit from victorious patent firm

Apple ordered to pay $533 million for patent infringement

February 25, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

By Andrew Chung NEW YORK (Reuters) – Apple Inc has been ordered to pay $532.9 million after a federal jury in Texas found that its iTunes software infringed three patents owned by patent licensing firm Smartflash LLC. Though Smartflash had been asking for $852 million in damages, Tuesday night's verdict was still a blow to Apple. The jury, which deliberated for eight hours, determined Apple had not only used Smartflash's patents without permission, but did so willfully. Apple, which said it would appeal, said the outcome was another reason reform was needed in the patent system to curb litigation by companies that don't make products themselves.

Read the original post:
Apple ordered to pay $533 million for patent infringement

Metalizing Mirrors for Astronomy

February 24, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Astronomy, the study of the stars and planets, is fueled almost entirely by our ability to see deep into space. Powerful microscopes that utilize highly reflective mirrors increase our ability to see farther into the reaches of space. This technology is a long way from the kind first utilized by Gallileo Galilei to observe the phases of Venus. Today’s technology is able to observe galaxies and other astronomical phenomena.

Such high powered mirrors would be in extremely short supply if not for advances in manufacturing that allowed for reduced material usage.

PVD Thermal Evaporation

Glass is fragile under extreme temperatures. If glass were placed in a super-heated chamber it would crack or shatter easily. As a result, precise controls are used to lower the temperatures from within the chamber. Metals are first heated until they take a gaseous form, then they are left in the cooling chamber where they settle across the surface of the glass. Silver or titanium metals are commonly used, and both have extremely high burning points.

Ion Beams

Ion beam sputter deposition systems accomplish a similar goal, but are used when precision is necessary. Normal sputter deposition coats a surface entirely. Using ion beams, the surface receives a coating applied to a specific area. This improves the density of the coating, and reduces the absorption of light. It also helps reduce any imperfections to the substrate caused by heating. If the substrate is damaged, even in a subtle way, it can reduce the overall quality of the mirror and ruin the astronomer’s perception.


 

Bio: Denton Vacuum, LLC manufactures devices used in ion beam etching for telescopic mirrors and a host of other applications.

Apple to spend $1.9 billion on new European data centers

February 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

(Reuters) – Apple Inc said it would spend 1.7 billion euros ($1.9 billion) to build two data centers in Europe that would be entirely powered by renewable energy and create hundreds of jobs. The company said the centers, in Ireland and Denmark, will power Apple's online services, including the iTunes Store, App Store, iMessage, Maps and Siri for customers across Europe. The investment is set to be evenly divided between the two countries, with the Irish government confirming that 850 million euros would be spent in Ireland. The two data centers are expected to begin operations in 2017.

Read more from the original source: 
Apple to spend $1.9 billion on new European data centers

Apple hiring big brains in car battery space

February 20, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

A year and a half ago, Apple Inc had applied for just eight patents related to auto batteries. Recently, it has hired a bevy of engineers, just one of whom had already filed for 17 in his former career, according to a Thomson Reuters analysis. The recent spate of hires and patent filings reviewed by Reuters shows that Apple is fast building its industrial lithium-ion battery capabilities, adding to evidence the iPhone maker may be developing a car. Quiet, clean electric cars are viewed in Silicon Valley and elsewhere as a promising technology for the future, but high costs and “range anxiety”, the concern that batteries will run out of power and cannot be recharged quickly, remain obstacles.

Read more: 
Apple hiring big brains in car battery space

Japan Display in talks with Apple to build iPhone screen plant: source

February 20, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Japan Display Inc is considering building a plant to supply smartphone screens for Apple Inc and is negotiating with the U.S. company for investment in the project, a person familiar with the situation said on Friday. The Japanese screen maker aims to be the primary supplier of high-tech screens for Apple's wildly popular iPhones, the person told Reuters. Global iPhone sales, notably in China, have surged to make Apple the most profitable company in history. Japan Display wants Apple to shoulder much of the expected 200 billion yen ($1.7 billion) investment in the plant, which aims to be in operation next year, the source said on condition of anonymity as the talks remain confidential.

View post: 
Japan Display in talks with Apple to build iPhone screen plant: source

Apple poaching auto engineers to build battery division: lawsuit

February 19, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

By Deepa Seetharaman and Edwin Chan SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Electric-car battery maker A123 Systems has sued Apple Inc for poaching top engineers to build a large-scale battery division, according to a court filing that offered further evidence that the iPhone maker may be developing a car. Apple has been poaching engineers with deep expertise in car systems, including from Tesla Inc, and talking with industry experts and automakers with the ultimate aim of learning how to make its own electric car, an auto industry source said last week. Around June 2014, Apple began aggressively poaching A123 engineers tasked with leading some of the company's most critical projects, the lawsuit said. The engineers jumped ship to pursue similar programs at Apple, in violation of their employment agreements, A123 said in a filing earlier this month in Massachusetts federal court.

Read the rest here:
Apple poaching auto engineers to build battery division: lawsuit

Next Page »